Tag Archives: skill

Shipwright Professions – Part 2

This is Part 2 of the Shipwright Profession, detailing the cost of various items Shipwrights and sailors might need.

The Ram and the Catapult were added directly from the Labyrinth Lord book; they’re included mainly for the purposes of completeness.

Nautical Items

  • Spyglass: 1,000 gp base price, requires 2 weeks to craft
  • Sundial: 8 gp
  • Compass: 10 gp
  • Astrolabe: 15 gp
  • Sextant: 25 gp

Piers

  • Piers are 10 ft wide and as long as the vessel that’s meant to dock there, rounded to nearest 10 ft increment, plus 20 ft to get to deeper water, in most cases. They cost 30 gp / 10 ft length and 1 week construction time per 20 ft of length.
    • There are two types of piers: floating and fixed. A floating pier is easier for a single person to build, but may be more easily damaged or washed away during a storm or flood.
  • For example: a 40 ft long vessel would need a 60 ft pier, cost 180 gp to build, and take a single builder 3 weeks to complete.

Naval Weapons

Ram
Range: Touch
Attacks as: Monster of under 1 HD
Damage: (1d4 +4) x10 shp or 3d8 hp; (1d6+5) x10 shp or 6d6 hp
The different damages listed for a ram apply as follows. The first shp value listed applies to rams on small vessels when attacking another vessel. The first hp value listed applies to attacking large aquatic monsters. Similarly, the second damage values apply to rams on larger ships to other ships or large aquatic monsters, respectively.

Cost: 30% of the total ship cost

Catapult
Rate of fire: variable; 1/5 rounds with 4 crew; 1/8 rounds with 3 crew; 1/10 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 150-300 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 10′ square
Damage: 3d6 shp or 1d6 shp fire per turn
Catapults can be operated by a variable number of crew, and this will affect rate of fire and attack ability as indicated above. The standard 3d6 damage reflects firing a solid missile.

Burning damage from combustible loads and pitch do the indicated fire damage. In takes a minimum of 5 crew members 3 turns to extinguish flames caused by a fire attack. For every five additional crewmembers, this time can be reduced by 1 turn to a minimum of 1 turn. A catapult cannot be used to attack a ship that is closer than the minimum range indicated.

Cost: 20% of the total ship cost

Ballista
Rate of fire: variable; 1/4 rounds with 4 crew; 1/6 rounds with 3 crew; 1/8 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 100-250 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 5′ square
Damage: 2d6 shp or 1d6 shp (spear ballista)
Ballista require a crew to operate properly; two to crank the bow back, one to load the bow and the leader directs the others, sets the ammunition, sights the target, and fires. Damage represents holes punctured in the hull.

Ballista have the advantage of being able to be set inside the hull for their crews protection if the builder chooses. On the deck, “spear ballista” can be use against large flying targets, but deals only 1d6 shp (1d6 x 5 hp)

Cost: 25% of the total ship cost

Gunpowder Cannon
Rate of fire: variable; 1/4 rounds with 3 crew; 1/5 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 150-500 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 15′ square
Damage: 5d6 shp
Cannons use gunpowder, a relatively new invention of the gnomes, to propel a heavy iron ball to punch huge holes in ship hulls. They hit so hard they are practically explosive.

These weapons are so heavy that only the largest vessels can bear to carry them or fire them without tearing themselves apart. Only Large Sailing Vessels, War Galleys, and Dreadnoughts can carry cannons.

Cost: 50% of the total ship cost. 30% when added to Dreadnoughts.

Vessels

Rank 1 vessels

  • Raft:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 1 (self)
    • Cost to build: 1 ep / sq ft
    • Base time to build: 1 week
    • SHP: 5 / sq. ft
    • Weapons: none
  • Canoe:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 1 (self)
    • Cost to build: 25 gp
    • Base time to build: 2 weeks
    • SHP: 5 to 10 (1d6+4)
    • Weapons: none
  • Lifeboat:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 400 gp
    • Base time to build: 4 weeks
    • SHP: 12 to 18 (2d4+10)
    • Weapons: none
  • Sailing boat:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 1,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 8 weeks
    • SHP: 20 to 45 (5d6+15)
    • Weapons: none

Rank 2 vessels

  • River boat:
    • Crew needed: 10
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 2,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 8 weeks
    • SHP: 20 to 45 (5d6+15)
    • Weapons: none
  • Small Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 12
    • Builders needed: 10
    • Cost to build: 3,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 65 to 90 (5d6+60)
    • Weapons: none
  • Small Galley
    • Crew needed: 100
    • Builders needed: 15
    • Cost to build: 6,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 75 to 100 (5d6+60)
    • Weapons: Ram and one ranged weapon; added separately
  • Longship
    • Crew needed: 75
    • Builders needed: 10
    • Cost to build: 8,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 10 weeks
    • SHP: 65 to 80 (5d4+60)
    • Weapons: One ranged weapon; added separately

Rank 3 vessels

  • Large Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 70
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 11,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 14 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 180 (5d12+120)
    • Weapons: Two ranged weapons; added separately
  • Transport Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 12
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 15,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 14 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 180 (5d12+120)
    • Weapons: none
  • Large Galley
    • Crew needed: 250
    • Builders needed: 20
    • Cost to build: 16,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 95 to 120 (5d6+90)
    • Weapons: Ram and two ranged weapons; added separately
  • War Galley
    • Crew needed: 400
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 32,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 18 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 150 (5d6+120)
    • Weapons: Ram, included, and three ranged weapons that can be added separately.

Rank 4 vessels

  • Dreadnought (Complete stats
    • Crew needed: 500
      • 300 rowers, 150 per side
      • 200 regular crew, including command
    • Builders needed: 60
    • Cost to build: 64,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 36 weeks
    • SHP: 175 to 270 (5d20+170)
    • Weapons: Ram and six ranged weapons; all included
      • Cannons can replace a ranged weapon for 30% per cannon added.
    • Speed: 100 ft / round sailing, 60 ft / round rowing
    • Miles traveled per day: 60 mi / day sailing, 36 mi / day rowing
    • Cargo: 45,000 lbs
    • Size: 60 ft wide, 220 ft long, draft of 8-12 ft

Shipwright Profession – Part 1

A Shipwright looks over his design

For newcomers, I’ll refer you to Secondary Professions and Skill Checks and Training and Improving Secondary Skills.

For campaigns that take place on the high seas, having a fleet of ships at your command is extremely helpful. Even underground, exploring the still lakes and hidden rivers of the Underdark can be made easier with the addition of a Shipwright. This professions focuses on the construction of vessels, hiring crews, and influencing those who respect the Shipwright’s craft. Learning this craft is rather expensive, but so are the ships being constructed.

Major Stat: INT     Minor Stat: WIS or DEX

Rank 1: Requires logs, nails, rope, wood glue, parchment, geometry tools, pencil, feather pen, etc. 150gp initial cost.

  • Make a skill check to craft a raft, canoe, sailing boat, or lifeboat. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to craft a dock. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to determine if a vessel is sea-worthy. Failure indicates a false determination half the time, uncertainty the other half. It cannot be reattempted on the same vessel until the character levels up again.
  • Make a skill check to determine one’s location and/or date reasonably accurately. This does require the proper astronomical equipment and no significant travel can be made that day.

Rank 2:

  • Make a skill check instead of a CHA check to influence the disposition of dockworkers and sailors.
  • Make a skill check to craft a river boat, small galley, a small sailing ship, and a longship. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • All Rank 1 vessel types do not require a skill check to craft.
  • Make a skill check to hire an especially skilled construction crew. This reduces building time by 10% (rounded up to the nearest full day) but increases the cost by 10%. The reverse is also possible. Failure indicates only ordinary builders are available, though the DM may decide that no workers are available at all.
  • Make a separate skill check to add weapons to a vessel that is not described as having one by default. Adding a ram costs 30% of the base cost. Adding a catapult costs 20% and a ballista is 25%. Failure reduces the SHP of the finished vessel by 20%.

Rank 3:

  • Make a skill check instead of a CHA check to influence the disposition of dockworkers, sailors, captains, and pirates.
  • Make a skill check to craft a large galley, war galley, a large sailing ship, and a transport sailing ship. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to build a dry-dock. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to hire an especially skill construction team. This will reduce the construction time needed by 20% but increasing the cost by 10%. Conversely, make a skill check to reduce the cost by 20% by increasing the time required by 10%. This replaces the Rank 2 ability.
  • When rolling for the SHP of a new vessel (or if the DM rolls for SHP at the time of purchase), roll twice and use the better result. No check required. Alternatively, a shipwright can tell whether two vessels have more, less, or roughly equal SHP compared to one another. This ability does not provide an exact value.
  • Make a skill check to create nautical astronomic equipment, including a spyglass for 75% of the cost. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to hire a ship crew that can repair SHP 50% faster than normal.

Rank 4:

  • Make a skill check instead of a CHA check to influence the disposition of dockworkers, sailors, captains, pirates, admirals, and pirate kings.
  • Make a skill check to craft a Dreadnought.
  • Adding a weapon to a vessel now requires no check.
  • Make a skill check to reduce the cost of adding weapons to a vessel that doesn’t have on by default by half. Failure doubles the cost of a single weapon (the most expensive one).
  • May purchase vessels built by others for 75% of the retail value

Notes on the construction of vessels:

As a general rule, building any sea vessel requires the following:

  • Lumber, materials, and construction crew totaling half the purchase price of the vessel. Each takes up a third of the total cost. It is possible to stockpile building materials. To make things simple, however, it’s easier to merely purchase the materials at the time of construction. I mention these mainly for players that want to minimize a price.
    • For Rank 1 vessels: 1 gp of lumber weighs 5 lbs. For Rank 2 vessels: 1 gp of lumber weighs 10 lbs. For Rank 3+ vessels: 1 gp of lumber weighs 20 lbs. This represents the fact that one is buying in bulk and the quality of the lumber. Smaller vessels need high quality, lighter woods. Larger vessels need mostly cut lumber. To stockpile lumber for Rank 2 vessels and above, characters must purchase lumber in bundles of at least 5x short tons (10,000 lbs total). When building a new ship, if a character’s stockpile has less what is needed, a lumberyard will often charge double if it is less than 10,000 lbs.
    • On average, 1 gp of miscellaneous materials weighs 1 lb. These can be purchased in any quantity.
    • Crews take up the final third of the cost and are paid up front for their work. Hiring double the crew will reduce the construction time by 50%, but double the pay the crew members will need. Doubling the crew again will reduce the time by an additional 50% (so a total of 75% reduced time), but again double the cost. Halving the number of workers keeps the total cost the same (due to accidents and screw ups on the job), but doubles the amount of time needed.
      • One cannot double a crew of one (yourself), but if the character hires or enlists another character to assist, pay the assistant his third. Even if payment is refused, it must be spent in some other way (food, lodgings, etc).
  • In the wild, building a raft or canoe still requires the expenditure of resources, even if the tools are makeshift and the wood is local. With proper tools, materials can found in 1 day, preparation takes 1 day, the remainder of the normal building time. Without proper tools, all aspects of construction take twice as long.
  • Creating a raft or a canoe does not require a dock because they are small and relatively lightweight. All vessels need to be built in a shelter protected from the elements. Anything that requires a crew to build may need a frame built, but that is included in the cost. However, a dock will be needed to launch the vessel. A dock is generally the same length as the vessel + 20 ft so that the water will be deep enough.
  • For very large vessels, a dry-dock may be desirable for repairs and for easy construction of new ships. A dry-dock reduces repair time by 25% and only the dry-dock is needed to launch ships.

Next week, I’ll be posting the prices, times, and crews needed for the various vessels and items I’ve described above.

Dweomercraft and Fletcher / Bowyer Professions

Dweomercraft and Fletcher / Bowyer Professions

For reference, here’s my original post on making Skill Checks and Training Secondary Skills.

In my setting anyway, Dweomercraft is the art of making magic wands, staves, and rods. In a broader sense, it could be used to describe the creation or study of any magic item, but I wanted a profession that specialized in items that (almost) always use charges and are of a similar overall design.

The Fletcher/Bowyer is much more straight-forward. Like the Blacksmith, at Rank 4, he can make magic weapons without the need for being a caster.

Dweomercraft

Major Stat: INT                Minor Stat: CHA

Rank 1: Requires special woods and metals, tools. 100gp initially, must be a caster.

  • Make a skill check within 24 hours of depleting a wand, staff, or rod to prevent it from becoming entirely non-magical, allowing it to be recharged again, if it can be.
  • Make a skill check to create a basic wand (1st level spell you can cast) with 5x charges at 10% of the cost and time.
  • Make a skill check at -1 to determine the number of charges left in a wand, staff or rod. Failure results in the loss of a charge.
  • Make a skill check at -1 to identify the nature (that is, a single spell, ability, or quality) of a wand, staff, or rod. Failure results in an accidental discharging of the device with unpleasant results.

Rank 2:

  • Make a skill check to determine the number of charges left in a wand, staff, or rod. Failure results in the loss of a charge 50% of the time and an incorrect value (+/- 25%) the other 50% of the time.
  • Make a skill check to identify the nature of a wand, staff, or rod. Failure means no information was gained and that aspect cannot identified with this skill (though experimentation or an Identify spell would work).
  • Make a skill check to create a wand, staff, road that uses any 1st to 3rd level spell you can cast.

Rank 3:

  • Can determine the number of charges (+/- 10%) without a check. Make a skill check to determine the exact amount. Failure indicates the original estimation.
  • Make a skill check at the time of use to prevent a charge from being depleted from a wand, staff, or rod. Failure prevents the item from being used for 1 round.
  • Make a skill check when recharging a wand, staff, or rod so that it gains 2 charges instead of 1. Failure may cause (roll 1d3): 1 – cause the spell to be cast normally and centered on the caster (no charges gained), 2 – reduce the maximum number of charges by 10% (one charge gained), 3 – gains 4 charges and will not accept new charges until 10% of the cost and time required to create the item are paid to repair it. 
  • Make a skill check to create any wand, staff, or rod that use spells you can cast.

Rank 4:

  • Can recharge a wand, staff or rod (if it can be) by casting a spell of the same level into it instead of the same spell. Requires no check.
  • Make a check when item creation is being finalized to create a wand, staff, or rod with 20% more charges than normal. Failure indicates that the item has a maximum charge of 20% lower.
  • Make a check to prepare a wand, staff, or rod to be recharged at x2 rate without any future checks by spending +10% at the time of creation. Failure indicates that the item resists taking charges, requiring two spells per charge.
  • Make a check to completely identify all abilities of a wand, staff, or rod.
  • While not requiring a skill check, Dispel Magic can be cast solely on a wand, staff, or rod to disrupt it. If not being held, a normal Dispel Magic  check is made, but if held by an enemy, the enemy’s caster level is considered instead. If successful, one of the following happens (1d4): 1 – the item loses all charges but can be recharged, 2 – the item explodes, dealing damage to all those within 15′ equal to 1d6 dmg per 2 charges remaining (rounded down), 3 – the wielder of the item is targeted once by each ability the item possess before losing all charges, 4 – the item snaps in two, destroying it, but the discharge of energy invigorates the wielder, giving back (randomly) one previously cast spell per 3 charges remaining in the item (rounded down).

Fletcher/Bowyer

Major Stat: INT                Minor Stat: DEX

Rank 1: Requires a workbench and tools. 25gp initially.

  • Make a skill check to shortbow, arrows & quiver, sling and bullets
  • Make a skill check at -1 to create a composite shortbow (wielder adds their STR bonus to damage)

Rank 2:

  • Make a skill check to create a longbow, light crossbow, bolts & bolt case. Only the crossbow and bolts requires a check.
  • Make a skill check to create a composite longbow.
  • Make a skill check at -1 to create a Rapid-Reload Bolt Case that lets the user fire two rounds in a row as long as he doesn’t move between the shots. Costs 100gp to create.
  • Make a skill check at -1 to create a Many-Shot Arrow Quiver that lets the user fire four arrows over two rounds as long as he doesn’t move between each volley. Costs 125gp to create.

Rank 3:

  • All previous weapon creation require no check.
  • Make a skill check to create a heavy crossbow.
  • Make a skill check to create a Masterwork ranged weapon
  • Make a skill check to attempt to use special materials to make a ranged weapon, arrows, bolts, or bullets.
  • Make a skill check to create a Rapid-Reload Bolt Case or a Many-Shot Arrow Quiver.
  • Make a skill check to determine if a ranged weapon or ammunition is magic and a separate check to identify its qualities. Failure indicates no information and it cannot be reattempted on that item.

Rank 4:

  • Can make all previous weapons and a Masterwork ranged weapon without a skill check.
  • Make a skill check to create a magic weapon or ammunition as a caster of 1/2 his level. Can specialize in a single special material so that no skill check is required to use that material.
  • Can determine if a ranged weapon or ammunition in magical without a check, but a skill check is still required to identify it.
  • Once in your character’s life (or once per campaign, DM’s discretion), make a skill check to create an Arrow of Slaying +3, even if your character isn’t high enough level. The Arrow is keyed to whatever specific type of creature the creator decides, but the DM has a final say. (In my opinion, ‘mammals’ should be excluded as an option)

Alchemist and Animals Trainer profession

Training a Bear

Here’s the first article on how to make a Skill Check and create items.

And here’s the second article on how to improve and learn new skills.

Alchemists are very useful additions to the party, since they can create useful potions and curatives for the party during downtime. An experienced Alchemist can even create potent poisons and combine the effects of potions safely. It’s also one of the few crafting professions that replicate magical effects that one doesn’t need to be a caster to be useful. An Alchemist just needs to deduce the method of brewing of a potion in order to replicate it.

Alchemist

Major Stat: INT                Minor Stat: WIS

Rank 1: Requires a laboratory with tools and equipment that costs 150gp initially. Further Ranks require upgrades to the lab.

  • Make a skill check to create non-magical curatives. It takes one day of work per curative. If you work for a week making curatives, it counts as two weeks of training towards Rank 2.
  • Can create alcoholic spirits. Beers require no check, but strong liquors require a skill check. The creation time varies, but at least a week.
  • Make a skill check at -1 to learn a magic potion. Must destroy a potion of that type as a sample and spending twice the normal time and money to replicate it the first time. Cannot brew additional magic potions yet.
  • Curatives are derived from a pdf I use sometimes called Esoteric Equipment.

Rank 2:

  • Can create curatives and alcoholic drinks without a skill check. The time required is still the same.
  • Make a skill check to learn a magic potion. This is done by destroying a sample, spending twice the time and money to replicate it the first time. Further replications of that potion are created as normal and requires a skill check.
  • If the character casts spells, can create a potions using 1st level spells, as appropriate, by spending twice the time and money to create it the first time. Further replications of that potion are created at half the time and money. Creating potions requires a skill check.

Rank 3:

  • Make a skill check to create potions using any appropriate spell they can cast. As usual, creating it the first time requires twice the time and money.
  • All learned potions require half the time and cost.
  • Potions based on spells 3rd level or lower require no skill check to create.
  • At the DM’s discretion, the Alchemist can create poisons with a skill check. If an 8 is rolled on the skill check, the Alchemist is exposed to the poison and he must Save vs Poison to avoid the effect. Of course, an Assassin has no chance of exposure. Learning a poison works the same as learning a potion.

Rank 4:

  • Can learn and create any potion without a skill check. Learning a potion requires the no additional time and money to replicate or research and doesn’t destroy the original sample.
  • Make a skill check to combine two potions together so they provide both effects. The check is done secretly by the DM and failure may be disastrous or beneficial (see Mixing Potions in the SRD). 
  • At the DM’s discretion, the Alchemist can make a skill check to create a potent poison that has an additional -2 to Save against. The poison costs twice as much and takes twice as long to make. In addition, he can no longer be exposed when making an ordinary poison.

Animal Trainer

Animals Trainers are useful in dealing with wildlife and in improving the behaviors of animals the party might make use of. In the long term, they are the most likely to be riding an exotic mount or make a fortune training one for someone else.

Major Stat: CHA         Minor Stat: STR

Rank 1:

  • Can train a dog, cat, horse, or bird a few basic tricks with no check.
  • Make a skill check to train a dog or horse to fight or a bird to be a messenger.
  • Make a skill check to calm down an angry or frightened domesticated animals.
  • Make a skill check at -1 to calm down an angry or frightened wild animal.

Rank 2:

  • Can train a dog to fight (and other combat tricks), a bird to ferry messages, and a horse to charge without a check.
  • Make a skill check to calm a wild animal or to tame a wild horse, dog, or other normally domesticated animal.
  • Make a skill check at -1 to calm down an angry or frightened magical animal.

Rank 3:

  • Choose a type of animal, even fantastical ones like griffon or dragon. You are an expert in training that sort of animal from birth to fight and/or accept a mount.
  • Make a skill check to calm down any animal, common or magical.

Rank 4:

  • Choose another type of animal to specialize in.
  • Make a skill check to cut the training time of any animal in half.
  • 1/day, the Trainer may Speak With Animals. Does not require a check.

The Language Skill

I like the idea that characters, even ones with a limited INT score can learn additional languages and dialects as they play. Going back to the example of Conan the Barbarian, I’ve seen character sheets that have him with 12 INT, but he knows a smattering of a dozen languages or more. However, he probably didn’t know much more than the basics; what’s needed to deal with regular people, soldiers, the local guard. In many cases, people in Hyboria spoke several languages, which made translating and teaching a new one much easier.

In that same vein, I think that characters should have the opportunity to learn new tongues if there’s enough exposure to it and they make an effort to learn it, no matter what their intelligence is.

Also, as an optional rule, only a single language or dialect can be learned or improved on per half year.

Previous posts on Skills:

Continue reading

Training and Improving Secondary Skills in Labyrinth Lord

Here is the previous post on Crafting and Secondary Skills is here.

Training Basics

To learn a skill, one needs to train in it. The training to achieve each Rank is expected to be extremely intensive and involved. The length required to earn a Rank in a skill is broken into Sessions.

Sessions in Novice and Proficient are 1 week long. Sessions in Expert and Master are 4 weeks long.

At the end of a particular Session of training, a percentile roll is made based on the Spell Learning Probability Table (now Skill Learning Probability) to see if the information is retained correctly. Learning a new skill is always based on Intelligence for that reason. Each Skill has a Major Stat and a Minor Stat, such as a WIS and DEX. Depending on the the score the character has in his Minor Stat, he may get a bonus to the Skill Learning check. A 15-16 gain +5%, 17 gain +10%, 18 gain +15%. The maximum probability is 99%. See the table below.

Failing a Skill Learning check at any Rank requires that another week of training be performed. This extra week occurs directly afterwards and requires no Skill Learning check as one hopefully learned their lesson the second time around. It’s up the DM to decide if the trainer wishes to charge the student for another week of training, but it wouldn’t be out of the question. During this week or to advance to the next Rank, a student might be required to successfully construct something or perform a difficult task (that is, it requires a Skill Check). If it isn’t completed, it must be attempted again until it is, though the trainer may decide to forgo his fee in the meantime.

A character may elect to stop training and create an item or perform a task relevant to the skill he’s learning. It must be something that requires a Skill Check. Successful or not, double the time spent counts towards his training, up to 3/4 the training time required.

One can stop training and restart it later, but, as a general guideline, a Rank should be learned within a year of when it was last stopped. A Session of training should be completed without interruption, but exceptions can be made of a few days.

Finding a Trainer

Finding a trainer may be as easy or as difficult as the DM decides. Finding someone willing to teach the lower Ranks of just about anything is possible even in a small town. However, if your characters wants to know how to train Dragons, forge an adamantium sword, make a Staff of Wizardy, or learn Celestial, they may have to find someone.

Making Charisma checks would be helpful here to find an initial Trainer or to find rumors of a one in the field the character wants to specialize in. It would also not be unreasonable for a lower Ranking Trainer to know who or where to find the next Trainer.

The cost for training is calculated per week and is negotiable. Generally, there is an initial expense for starting equipment, which is variable. At each Rank, the cost of equipment doubles from the previous Rank’s. At Rank 1, training should cost 1d10x10gp per session. This cost is re-rolled at the next Rank, but will generally quadruple.

A character can learn a number of skills based on the Maximum Spells per Level table. Players start with two of these slot filled: their starting skill or profession and the Language skill. Note that learning additional languages doesn’t take up more slots.

To summarize:

  • Training a skill is broken down into training Sessions of either a week or four weeks.
  • Training with an instructor requires payment: once per Session and the one-time cost per Rank of equipment, if any.
  • At the end of a Session with an instructor, make a % roll using the table below. If it fails, it takes a bit of extra time to learn.
  • A character may also train themselves by building something or performing an action that requires him to make a Skill Check using the skill he’s training in.
  • Such independent training counts for x2 the time (or a minimum of 1 week) and can be used to bypass 3/4 of the formal training. Advancement occurs even if the Skill Check fails.

The table below is split into two sections. On the left are the values related to a character’s Intelligence score and their Minor Stat score. On the right are the cost, time requires, and the bonus that each Rank provides to Skill Checks.

(aside: I admit that my html is not the greatest, so if it’s really difficult to read, I’ll find a way to change it.)

INT score Skill Learning Probability Minor Stat Bonus (Learning) Minor Stat Bonus (Checks) Max # of Skills Rank level Cost / session + equipment Time Required (# of Sessions) Rank Bonus
3 20% 0 0 3 1 1d10 x 10gp + equipment 4 weeks (4) +0
4-5 30% 0 0 4 2 1d10 x 40gp + equipment x2 16 weeks (16) +1
6-7 35% 0 0 5 3 1d10 x 160gp + equipment x4 36 weeks (9) +2
8-9 40% 0 0 6 4 1d10 x 360gp + equipment x8 64 weeks (16) +3
10-12 50% 0 0 7 5? 1d10 x 1440gp + equipment x16 256 weeks (64) +3 (+4)
13-14 70% 0 +1 9
15-16 75% +5% +1 11
17 85% +10% +1 Unlimited
18 90% +15% +2 Unlimited

Next week, I’ll cover the Language Skill and several other skills. After that, I’ll include three Skills per week.

Crafting and Secondary Skills in Labyrinth Lord

The Advanced Edition Companion to Labyrinth Lord comes with a short table of Secondary Skills that players can either roll randomly for or choose for their character. Some seem more useful as flavor, but some could have some practical use for an Adventurer. However, the DM is left to their own devices to determine when and if these secondary skills are useful during the PC’s careers. The system I’ve implemented into my game allows player to make use of the more useful of these skills to create items and make a bit of money on the side.

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