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Shipwright Professions – Part 2

This is Part 2 of the Shipwright Profession, detailing the cost of various items Shipwrights and sailors might need.

The Ram and the Catapult were added directly from the Labyrinth Lord book; they’re included mainly for the purposes of completeness.

Nautical Items

  • Spyglass: 1,000 gp base price, requires 2 weeks to craft
  • Sundial: 8 gp
  • Compass: 10 gp
  • Astrolabe: 15 gp
  • Sextant: 25 gp

Piers

  • Piers are 10 ft wide and as long as the vessel that’s meant to dock there, rounded to nearest 10 ft increment, plus 20 ft to get to deeper water, in most cases. They cost 30 gp / 10 ft length and 1 week construction time per 20 ft of length.
    • There are two types of piers: floating and fixed. A floating pier is easier for a single person to build, but may be more easily damaged or washed away during a storm or flood.
  • For example: a 40 ft long vessel would need a 60 ft pier, cost 180 gp to build, and take a single builder 3 weeks to complete.

Naval Weapons

Ram
Range: Touch
Attacks as: Monster of under 1 HD
Damage: (1d4 +4) x10 shp or 3d8 hp; (1d6+5) x10 shp or 6d6 hp
The different damages listed for a ram apply as follows. The first shp value listed applies to rams on small vessels when attacking another vessel. The first hp value listed applies to attacking large aquatic monsters. Similarly, the second damage values apply to rams on larger ships to other ships or large aquatic monsters, respectively.

Cost: 30% of the total ship cost

Catapult
Rate of fire: variable; 1/5 rounds with 4 crew; 1/8 rounds with 3 crew; 1/10 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 150-300 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 10′ square
Damage: 3d6 shp or 1d6 shp fire per turn
Catapults can be operated by a variable number of crew, and this will affect rate of fire and attack ability as indicated above. The standard 3d6 damage reflects firing a solid missile.

Burning damage from combustible loads and pitch do the indicated fire damage. In takes a minimum of 5 crew members 3 turns to extinguish flames caused by a fire attack. For every five additional crewmembers, this time can be reduced by 1 turn to a minimum of 1 turn. A catapult cannot be used to attack a ship that is closer than the minimum range indicated.

Cost: 20% of the total ship cost

Ballista
Rate of fire: variable; 1/4 rounds with 4 crew; 1/6 rounds with 3 crew; 1/8 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 100-250 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 5′ square
Damage: 2d6 shp or 1d6 shp (spear ballista)
Ballista require a crew to operate properly; two to crank the bow back, one to load the bow and the leader directs the others, sets the ammunition, sights the target, and fires. Damage represents holes punctured in the hull.

Ballista have the advantage of being able to be set inside the hull for their crews protection if the builder chooses. On the deck, “spear ballista” can be use against large flying targets, but deals only 1d6 shp (1d6 x 5 hp)

Cost: 25% of the total ship cost

Gunpowder Cannon
Rate of fire: variable; 1/4 rounds with 3 crew; 1/5 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 150-500 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 15′ square
Damage: 5d6 shp
Cannons use gunpowder, a relatively new invention of the gnomes, to propel a heavy iron ball to punch huge holes in ship hulls. They hit so hard they are practically explosive.

These weapons are so heavy that only the largest vessels can bear to carry them or fire them without tearing themselves apart. Only Large Sailing Vessels, War Galleys, and Dreadnoughts can carry cannons.

Cost: 50% of the total ship cost. 30% when added to Dreadnoughts.

Vessels

Rank 1 vessels

  • Raft:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 1 (self)
    • Cost to build: 1 ep / sq ft
    • Base time to build: 1 week
    • SHP: 5 / sq. ft
    • Weapons: none
  • Canoe:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 1 (self)
    • Cost to build: 25 gp
    • Base time to build: 2 weeks
    • SHP: 5 to 10 (1d6+4)
    • Weapons: none
  • Lifeboat:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 400 gp
    • Base time to build: 4 weeks
    • SHP: 12 to 18 (2d4+10)
    • Weapons: none
  • Sailing boat:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 1,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 8 weeks
    • SHP: 20 to 45 (5d6+15)
    • Weapons: none

Rank 2 vessels

  • River boat:
    • Crew needed: 10
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 2,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 8 weeks
    • SHP: 20 to 45 (5d6+15)
    • Weapons: none
  • Small Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 12
    • Builders needed: 10
    • Cost to build: 3,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 65 to 90 (5d6+60)
    • Weapons: none
  • Small Galley
    • Crew needed: 100
    • Builders needed: 15
    • Cost to build: 6,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 75 to 100 (5d6+60)
    • Weapons: Ram and one ranged weapon; added separately
  • Longship
    • Crew needed: 75
    • Builders needed: 10
    • Cost to build: 8,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 10 weeks
    • SHP: 65 to 80 (5d4+60)
    • Weapons: One ranged weapon; added separately

Rank 3 vessels

  • Large Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 70
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 11,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 14 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 180 (5d12+120)
    • Weapons: Two ranged weapons; added separately
  • Transport Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 12
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 15,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 14 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 180 (5d12+120)
    • Weapons: none
  • Large Galley
    • Crew needed: 250
    • Builders needed: 20
    • Cost to build: 16,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 95 to 120 (5d6+90)
    • Weapons: Ram and two ranged weapons; added separately
  • War Galley
    • Crew needed: 400
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 32,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 18 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 150 (5d6+120)
    • Weapons: Ram, included, and three ranged weapons that can be added separately.

Rank 4 vessels

  • Dreadnought (Complete stats
    • Crew needed: 500
      • 300 rowers, 150 per side
      • 200 regular crew, including command
    • Builders needed: 60
    • Cost to build: 64,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 36 weeks
    • SHP: 175 to 270 (5d20+170)
    • Weapons: Ram and six ranged weapons; all included
      • Cannons can replace a ranged weapon for 30% per cannon added.
    • Speed: 100 ft / round sailing, 60 ft / round rowing
    • Miles traveled per day: 60 mi / day sailing, 36 mi / day rowing
    • Cargo: 45,000 lbs
    • Size: 60 ft wide, 220 ft long, draft of 8-12 ft
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Shipwright Profession – Part 1

A Shipwright looks over his design

For newcomers, I’ll refer you to Secondary Professions and Skill Checks and Training and Improving Secondary Skills.

For campaigns that take place on the high seas, having a fleet of ships at your command is extremely helpful. Even underground, exploring the still lakes and hidden rivers of the Underdark can be made easier with the addition of a Shipwright. This professions focuses on the construction of vessels, hiring crews, and influencing those who respect the Shipwright’s craft. Learning this craft is rather expensive, but so are the ships being constructed.

Major Stat: INT     Minor Stat: WIS or DEX

Rank 1: Requires logs, nails, rope, wood glue, parchment, geometry tools, pencil, feather pen, etc. 150gp initial cost.

  • Make a skill check to craft a raft, canoe, sailing boat, or lifeboat. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to craft a dock. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to determine if a vessel is sea-worthy. Failure indicates a false determination half the time, uncertainty the other half. It cannot be reattempted on the same vessel until the character levels up again.
  • Make a skill check to determine one’s location and/or date reasonably accurately. This does require the proper astronomical equipment and no significant travel can be made that day.

Rank 2:

  • Make a skill check instead of a CHA check to influence the disposition of dockworkers and sailors.
  • Make a skill check to craft a river boat, small galley, a small sailing ship, and a longship. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • All Rank 1 vessel types do not require a skill check to craft.
  • Make a skill check to hire an especially skilled construction crew. This reduces building time by 10% (rounded up to the nearest full day) but increases the cost by 10%. The reverse is also possible. Failure indicates only ordinary builders are available, though the DM may decide that no workers are available at all.
  • Make a separate skill check to add weapons to a vessel that is not described as having one by default. Adding a ram costs 30% of the base cost. Adding a catapult costs 20% and a ballista is 25%. Failure reduces the SHP of the finished vessel by 20%.

Rank 3:

  • Make a skill check instead of a CHA check to influence the disposition of dockworkers, sailors, captains, and pirates.
  • Make a skill check to craft a large galley, war galley, a large sailing ship, and a transport sailing ship. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to build a dry-dock. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to hire an especially skill construction team. This will reduce the construction time needed by 20% but increasing the cost by 10%. Conversely, make a skill check to reduce the cost by 20% by increasing the time required by 10%. This replaces the Rank 2 ability.
  • When rolling for the SHP of a new vessel (or if the DM rolls for SHP at the time of purchase), roll twice and use the better result. No check required. Alternatively, a shipwright can tell whether two vessels have more, less, or roughly equal SHP compared to one another. This ability does not provide an exact value.
  • Make a skill check to create nautical astronomic equipment, including a spyglass for 75% of the cost. Failure indicates that half the materials are lost and it must be reattempted.
  • Make a skill check to hire a ship crew that can repair SHP 50% faster than normal.

Rank 4:

  • Make a skill check instead of a CHA check to influence the disposition of dockworkers, sailors, captains, pirates, admirals, and pirate kings.
  • Make a skill check to craft a Dreadnought.
  • Adding a weapon to a vessel now requires no check.
  • Make a skill check to reduce the cost of adding weapons to a vessel that doesn’t have on by default by half. Failure doubles the cost of a single weapon (the most expensive one).
  • May purchase vessels built by others for 75% of the retail value

Notes on the construction of vessels:

As a general rule, building any sea vessel requires the following:

  • Lumber, materials, and construction crew totaling half the purchase price of the vessel. Each takes up a third of the total cost. It is possible to stockpile building materials. To make things simple, however, it’s easier to merely purchase the materials at the time of construction. I mention these mainly for players that want to minimize a price.
    • For Rank 1 vessels: 1 gp of lumber weighs 5 lbs. For Rank 2 vessels: 1 gp of lumber weighs 10 lbs. For Rank 3+ vessels: 1 gp of lumber weighs 20 lbs. This represents the fact that one is buying in bulk and the quality of the lumber. Smaller vessels need high quality, lighter woods. Larger vessels need mostly cut lumber. To stockpile lumber for Rank 2 vessels and above, characters must purchase lumber in bundles of at least 5x short tons (10,000 lbs total). When building a new ship, if a character’s stockpile has less what is needed, a lumberyard will often charge double if it is less than 10,000 lbs.
    • On average, 1 gp of miscellaneous materials weighs 1 lb. These can be purchased in any quantity.
    • Crews take up the final third of the cost and are paid up front for their work. Hiring double the crew will reduce the construction time by 50%, but double the pay the crew members will need. Doubling the crew again will reduce the time by an additional 50% (so a total of 75% reduced time), but again double the cost. Halving the number of workers keeps the total cost the same (due to accidents and screw ups on the job), but doubles the amount of time needed.
      • One cannot double a crew of one (yourself), but if the character hires or enlists another character to assist, pay the assistant his third. Even if payment is refused, it must be spent in some other way (food, lodgings, etc).
  • In the wild, building a raft or canoe still requires the expenditure of resources, even if the tools are makeshift and the wood is local. With proper tools, materials can found in 1 day, preparation takes 1 day, the remainder of the normal building time. Without proper tools, all aspects of construction take twice as long.
  • Creating a raft or a canoe does not require a dock because they are small and relatively lightweight. All vessels need to be built in a shelter protected from the elements. Anything that requires a crew to build may need a frame built, but that is included in the cost. However, a dock will be needed to launch the vessel. A dock is generally the same length as the vessel + 20 ft so that the water will be deep enough.
  • For very large vessels, a dry-dock may be desirable for repairs and for easy construction of new ships. A dry-dock reduces repair time by 25% and only the dry-dock is needed to launch ships.

Next week, I’ll be posting the prices, times, and crews needed for the various vessels and items I’ve described above.

Street-hood Profession

A higher-ranking (former) Street-hood

For newcomers, I’ll refer you to Secondary Professions and Skill Checks and Training and Improving Secondary Skills.

The Street-hood profession is useful for campaigns that don’t include a Bard or are set in mostly urban environments. A Street-hood is connected; he’s got acquaintances (if not friends) everywhere and, given enough time, can help the party get into just about anywhere. He’s an information broker, a minor escape artist, and able to survive the roughest prisons.

Major Stat: INT or CHA        Minor Stat: WIS

Requirements: Strictly speaking, Street-hood should be acquired at Level 1 as part of the character’s backstory or, later, as a result of the character losing all worldly possessions. How else can he learn how to survive on the streets with nothing, if he has easy access to his wealth and weapons? That being said, an alternative would be to operate under an assumed name and “give up” those possessions: give them away, sell them, entrust them to someone else, put it into a bank vault, and so on. This is less “authentic”, since it’s possible to go back to their old life, but it’s not quite as easy.

Level 1 characters with Street-hood: Since characters using this system start with Rank 3 of their profession, it’s assumed that he’s already made a few connections within his home city, town, or the starting location, though the player may decide he wants to make his own connections.

Normally, a Street-hood can have a number of Contacts (see below) equal to twice the number of the Retainers he could have, depending on his CHA score. So a Level 1 character would start knowing 1/4 of that number (rounded down); generally, between 1 and 3 Contacts.

As a guide and in order of preference: the first Contact is a Hoodlum and a close childhood friend. The Hoodlum works under the second Contact, a Thug who can acquire some contraband for the character. The Thug works for the third Contact, a Dealer, who is a fence of all types of goods.

Aside: Normally, one must start a chain of Contacts from Street-rat on up, but the Level 1 character was once the Street-rat before he or she took up adventuring. See below for the list of titles.

Paying for training: Paying for training in this skill is still required, but isn’t done in the traditional way and requires a bit of imagination. In the case of leaving one’s wealth behind, examples might be: accrued rent for a bank vault or other security for one’s wealth, shifting and repayment of debts made through gambling, botched jobs, and criminal fines, and initiation fees. If the character is entirely destitute when he begins, he can pay his dues through the normal way money is earned with professions (see below)

After acquiring Rank 1 the going becomes somewhat easier; the character has made connections and paying your “trainers” in a more direct fashion becomes much easier.

Rank 1: Hoodlum

Requires 100gp for the initial training, which includes the 10gp to gain a Street-rat Contact (see below). This covers the ‘initiation’ cost of getting other Street-rats and Hoodlums to trust your character.

  • Make a skill check to gain information by asking around or picking your own memory. You can learn general information about a person, place or thing so long as the target is something a commoner in the area would know about.
  • Make a skill check to create a shiv from materials surrounding your character. A shiv does 1d3+Str damage, but if done as a Backstab, it does x3 damage. It will also break or be useless after 5 rounds or when a violent encounter ends, whichever is sooner. It takes 1 Turn to craft a shiv.
  • You may substitute a CHA check for your Street-hood skill check to influence those on the same social level as you; typically, those who only have Rank 1 Street-hood.
  • Make a skill check to “craft” a contact. This works the same as ordinary crafting and saves you the trouble of roleplaying every aspect of it, though that would save you time and money. However, you’re creating an NPC for a specific purpose. This NPC will generally be loyal to you, but won’t act outside of their role or act against their best interests. Examples might be: a fence for selling stolen goods, a source to purchase some unavailable type of item, a source of reliable information on a particular group of people, a person to help you enter a secure building, and so on. The DM has the final say on the scope of your contact.
  • Contacts can get information on or help you connect with those one step above them and have very reliable information about the people lower-ranking than themselves. Higher-ranking contacts must be built from previous contacts.
  • At Rank 1, you can create a Street-rat or a Hoodlum contact. At this Rank, it takes 1 day / 50gp of the creation cost (rounded up), minimum 1 full day. These days do not need to be consecutive. At least one week must elapse between the creation of a contact. This cost covers the expenses incurred getting on this character’s good side, if not their trust.
  • A Street-hood may have twice as many Contacts as he could retainers, depending on his CHA score. A Contact’s morale (and therefore their probability to do something very risky for the Street-hood) is also dependent on his CHA score.
  • A contact’s buy/sell maximum is the total amount they’re willing to buy or sell you in a single transaction. This amount typically resets at the beginning of each week.

Rank 2: Thug

  • Make a skill check to gain information by asking around or picking your own memory. You can learn general information about a person, place or thing so long as the target is something a well-to-do merchant in the area would know about.
  • Make a skill check to craft a shank from materials surrounding your character. A shank does 1d6+Str damage, but if done as a Backstab, it does x3 damage. It will also break or be useless after 8 rounds or after two violent encounters end, whichever is sooner. It takes 2 Turns to craft a shiv.
  • You may substitute a CHA check for your Street-hood skill check to influence those on the same social level as you, typically those with Rank 1 or Rank 2 Street-hood.
  • Make a skill check to “craft” a contact at the level of Thug or Dealer. At Rank 2, it takes 1 day / 100gp of the creation cost. These days do not need to be consecutive.

Rank 3: Dealer

  • Make a skill check to gain information by asking around or picking your own memory. You can learn general information about a person, place or thing so long as the target is something a well-connected aristocrat in the area would know about.
  • Make a skill check to escape from ropes, bindings, manacles, Hold spells, and so on. This reflects your knowledge and experience of being bound, your will to survive, and general wiliness. One attempt can be made, at most, once every Turn, but after three failed attempts, escape is impossible unless a new Hold spell, manacle, binding, etc is attached.
  • You may substitute a CHA check for your Street-hood skill check to influence those on the same social level as you, typically those with Rank 1 to Rank 3 Street-hood.
  • Make a skill check to “craft” a contact at the level of Boss or Fixer. At Rank 3, it takes 1 day / 500gp of the creation cost. These days do not need to be consecutive.

 Rank 4: Fixer

  • Make a skill check to gain information by asking around or picking your own memory. You can learn general information about a person, place or thing so long as the target is something a local king’s close adviser would know about.
  • Make a skill check to get around a city unobserved and in 75% of the time normally required. The Street-hood must have at least one Contact in the city in order for this to function. This reflects the Street-hood’s knowledge of the back-alleys, shortcuts, ability to blend in, and use of tight-lipped contacts to help him move quickly. The Street-hood may bring with him up to 1 person / 2 total levels he has. Bulky cargo counts as two people. This ability may not be used more than once per week.
  • You may substitute a CHA check for your Street-hood skill check to influence those on the same social level as you, typically those with Rank 1 to Rank 4 Street-hood.
  • Make a skill check to “craft” a contact at the level of Broker. At Rank 4, it takes 1 day / 500gp of the creation cost. These days do not need to be consecutive.

Doing Street-hood jobs: Normally, when one earns money with a profession, one makes a Skill Check every week to find a job. This still applies, but one can choose which of their Contacts to ask for a job. The higher up in the chain the Contact is, the character can earn more money.

Earning money is done normally using a 1d20 and adding the Contact’s multiplyer (see below). However, if a 1 is rolled, no money is earned and the Contact makes a Morale check, due to the job having been botched. If the Morale check fails, the Contact loses all faith and cuts contact with the character. The Morale of all Contacts above the lost Contact is worsened by 1 as a result. This also breaks the chain of Contacts, so the character cannot do a job for any higher-ranking Contacts until the chain is restored with a new Contact.

If the Morale check is two sixes (box-cars, so to speak), the Contact was so enraged that he turned the character into the authorities or allowed the character to be implicated. Roll another d20 and add the Contact’s multiplier again; this is the fine (in gold pieces) the character must pay or be jailed for an equal number of days, rounded up to the nearest week or month (depending on the severity).

Optional Rule: Once the player starts doing things on other planes, they may need to make more exotic Contacts in the cities they travel to. Extra-planar Contacts typically cost more; perhaps 2x to 10x as much depending on the location and due to their special needs and appetites. These exotic Contacts could count separately from those on the Material Plane, but one may have only half as many Contacts per Plane.

I’d advise that Demi-gods, Gods, Arch-Devils, Demon Lords, and other very powerful beings be exempt from being a Contact, since they typically lack much interest in mortal, worldly affairs. Such beings are better dealt with by the appropriate Clerics and Magic-User spells.

Title Creation Cost Buy/Sell Max Job Mutliplyer
Street-rat 10 gp 20 gp 1x
Hoodlum 50 gp 100 gp 2x
Thug 100 gp 200 gp 4x
Dealer 500 gp 1,500 gp 10x
Boss 2,500 gp 7,500 gp 20x
Fixer 5,000 gp 20,000 gp 30x
Broker 15,000 gp 60,000 gp 50x

Scribe Profession

Scribe being distracted by the Demon of Typos

Scribe Profession

The scribe is, of course, incredibly useful for any spell-caster profession to create scrolls and wards, but any class can benefit from learning the first few Ranks. However, since the profession is geared more towards casters, they’re unlikely to benefit from learning Rank 4.

Major Stat: INT or WIS        Minor Stat: none

Apply INT or WIS depending on whether the spell is Arcane or Divine, respectively. If one is creating a forgery or a Ward scroll, only INT should be used.

Rank 1: Requires a desk, sheets of paper, vellum, parchment, quill, inks. 50gp initially.

  • At Rank 1, choose to also specialize in Forgery or in Wards.
  • Can create illuminated texts at a rate of 1 page / day without a skill check.
  • Forgery: Make a skill check to create a forgery of a simple document. Requires materials equal to 200gp divided by level. The DM will decide how much time is required to create the forgery, but it must take at least one day of effort. Failure means that the forgery is immediately discovered by anyone who examines it.
  • Examples include a letter from someone with mild importance, a writ of passage from a minor noble from a very distant location, or a fake item that would normally be worth the base value above (200gp).
  • Wards: Make a skill check to create a Scroll of Protection Against Evil. Failure means that, once cast, the spell fails automatically.

Rank 2:

  • Make a skill check to create magical scrolls based on 1st level spells. The Scribe must be able to cast the spell. Failure means that the time and money spent are wasted.
  • Forgery: Make a skill check to create a forgery of a more complex document. Requires materials worth 500gp divided by level. Examples include a licence to practice magic, a letter from someone of significant authority, or a fake item worth as much as the base value above (500gp).
  • Make a skill check to create a message that will appear to be something else, but will only become visible to the recipient.
  • Wards: Make a skill check to create a Ward Against Undead, a Ward Against Lycanthropes, and a Ward Against Elementals.
  • Creating a Scroll of Protection from Evil does not require a skill check.

Rank 3:

  • Make a skill check to create magical scrolls based on any spell he can cast.
  • Can create scrolls of 3rd level or lower without a skill check.
  • Forgery: Make a skill check to create a forgery of a complex nature. Requires materials worth 2000gp divided by level. Examples include a pardon written by another city’s magistrate, a letter written by a high nobleman, or a fake item normally worth the base value above (2000gp).
  • If the Scribe is a caster capable of casting Illusion spells, all those trying to disbelieve one of his illusions does so at a -2.
  • Ward: Make a skill check to create any Ward Scroll. In addition, a Ward Against Demons and a Ward Against Devils can be created.

Rank 4:

  • Can create magical scrolls with no skill check at a 25% discount to time and money required.
  • Make a skill check to create a scroll case that will protect your scrolls from harm for 2000gp and 1 week of creation time.
  • Forgery: Make a skill check to create a forgery of a very complex nature. Requires materials worth 5000gp divided by level. Examples include a royal pardon, a letter written by someone of legendary fame, or a fake item normally worth the base value above (5000gp).
  • If the Scribe is a caster capable of casting Illusion spells, all those trying to disbelieve one of his illusions does so at a -4.
  • Wards: Can create Rank 2 Wards with no skill check. All Wards are created at a 25% discount to time and money required.
  • If the Scribe is a caster, he can prepare a Ward in any spell slot (during his spell-preparation) and cast it without retrieving the scroll, though it is used up as normal.

Jeweller and Locksmith Professions

Fëanor with Silmaril

Fëanor with Silmaril

Jeweller and Locksmith Professions

As usual, I want to link those interested back to Secondary Skills and How to Make Skill Checks and How to Improve Secondary Skills.

The Jeweller is probably one of the most lucrative professions in the secondary skill set and very handy for a Thief or Magic-User to practice. I’ve based it loosely on the Middle-Earth hero and jewel-crafter from the First Age, Fëanor. Perhaps, at Rank 5 – Grandmaster, a Jeweller could craft a Silmaril or something similar.
The profession can also work very closely with the Miner profession (which I’ll be including in the coming weeks), merchants who deal in gems or precious metals, or mine-owners who could be persuaded to sell their raw gem-stones. Now, in my games I tend not to bother with the appraising of items too much, but if you and your players dig the lore and background of every antique piece of jewelled finery they encounter, I’ve included some guidelines for you on how much to tell your Jeweller.

As a Master he can even create a powerful magical jewel: a once-in-a-lifetime achievement of his art.

The Locksmith is useful for any class, but especially the Thief or Assassin, who may want to keep their fortunes locked up without anyone knowing exactly how and who also gain a moderate bonus to their Pick Locks ability as compensation for the redundancy. Fighters and Rangers may have a need for the ability to secure prisoners. Wizards and Clerics may want to keep their sanctums secure. Also, in any party where there is no Thief, Monk, or Assassin, having a Locksmith can be very valuable at maintaining the element of surprise (less need to bash down doors and chests).
As a Master, the Locksmith can even add some magical protections to his locks and create the legendary Skeleton Key. Continue reading

Blacksmith and Doctor professions

The Doctor profession is quite useful if there is no Cleric or Druid in the party, especially in the early game. If they learn Alchemy they’d be even more useful. The downside is that, unlike divine magic, failing a Doctor’s skill check can do more harm to the patient. They also take much longer to perform their treatments.

Blacksmithing is the only one of my secondary skills and professions that branches off into two.. In theory, the doctor could as well, but medieval medicine wasn’t as specialized as it is today.

Continue reading