Tag Archives: house rule

Shipwright Professions – Part 2

This is Part 2 of the Shipwright Profession, detailing the cost of various items Shipwrights and sailors might need.

The Ram and the Catapult were added directly from the Labyrinth Lord book; they’re included mainly for the purposes of completeness.

Nautical Items

  • Spyglass: 1,000 gp base price, requires 2 weeks to craft
  • Sundial: 8 gp
  • Compass: 10 gp
  • Astrolabe: 15 gp
  • Sextant: 25 gp

Piers

  • Piers are 10 ft wide and as long as the vessel that’s meant to dock there, rounded to nearest 10 ft increment, plus 20 ft to get to deeper water, in most cases. They cost 30 gp / 10 ft length and 1 week construction time per 20 ft of length.
    • There are two types of piers: floating and fixed. A floating pier is easier for a single person to build, but may be more easily damaged or washed away during a storm or flood.
  • For example: a 40 ft long vessel would need a 60 ft pier, cost 180 gp to build, and take a single builder 3 weeks to complete.

Naval Weapons

Ram
Range: Touch
Attacks as: Monster of under 1 HD
Damage: (1d4 +4) x10 shp or 3d8 hp; (1d6+5) x10 shp or 6d6 hp
The different damages listed for a ram apply as follows. The first shp value listed applies to rams on small vessels when attacking another vessel. The first hp value listed applies to attacking large aquatic monsters. Similarly, the second damage values apply to rams on larger ships to other ships or large aquatic monsters, respectively.

Cost: 30% of the total ship cost

Catapult
Rate of fire: variable; 1/5 rounds with 4 crew; 1/8 rounds with 3 crew; 1/10 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 150-300 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 10′ square
Damage: 3d6 shp or 1d6 shp fire per turn
Catapults can be operated by a variable number of crew, and this will affect rate of fire and attack ability as indicated above. The standard 3d6 damage reflects firing a solid missile.

Burning damage from combustible loads and pitch do the indicated fire damage. In takes a minimum of 5 crew members 3 turns to extinguish flames caused by a fire attack. For every five additional crewmembers, this time can be reduced by 1 turn to a minimum of 1 turn. A catapult cannot be used to attack a ship that is closer than the minimum range indicated.

Cost: 20% of the total ship cost

Ballista
Rate of fire: variable; 1/4 rounds with 4 crew; 1/6 rounds with 3 crew; 1/8 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 100-250 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 5′ square
Damage: 2d6 shp or 1d6 shp (spear ballista)
Ballista require a crew to operate properly; two to crank the bow back, one to load the bow and the leader directs the others, sets the ammunition, sights the target, and fires. Damage represents holes punctured in the hull.

Ballista have the advantage of being able to be set inside the hull for their crews protection if the builder chooses. On the deck, “spear ballista” can be use against large flying targets, but deals only 1d6 shp (1d6 x 5 hp)

Cost: 25% of the total ship cost

Gunpowder Cannon
Rate of fire: variable; 1/4 rounds with 3 crew; 1/5 rounds with 2 crew
Range: 150-500 yards
Attacks as: Fighter level equal to crew number firing
Area effect: 15′ square
Damage: 5d6 shp
Cannons use gunpowder, a relatively new invention of the gnomes, to propel a heavy iron ball to punch huge holes in ship hulls. They hit so hard they are practically explosive.

These weapons are so heavy that only the largest vessels can bear to carry them or fire them without tearing themselves apart. Only Large Sailing Vessels, War Galleys, and Dreadnoughts can carry cannons.

Cost: 50% of the total ship cost. 30% when added to Dreadnoughts.

Vessels

Rank 1 vessels

  • Raft:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 1 (self)
    • Cost to build: 1 ep / sq ft
    • Base time to build: 1 week
    • SHP: 5 / sq. ft
    • Weapons: none
  • Canoe:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 1 (self)
    • Cost to build: 25 gp
    • Base time to build: 2 weeks
    • SHP: 5 to 10 (1d6+4)
    • Weapons: none
  • Lifeboat:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 400 gp
    • Base time to build: 4 weeks
    • SHP: 12 to 18 (2d4+10)
    • Weapons: none
  • Sailing boat:
    • Crew needed: 1
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 1,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 8 weeks
    • SHP: 20 to 45 (5d6+15)
    • Weapons: none

Rank 2 vessels

  • River boat:
    • Crew needed: 10
    • Builders needed: 5
    • Cost to build: 2,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 8 weeks
    • SHP: 20 to 45 (5d6+15)
    • Weapons: none
  • Small Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 12
    • Builders needed: 10
    • Cost to build: 3,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 65 to 90 (5d6+60)
    • Weapons: none
  • Small Galley
    • Crew needed: 100
    • Builders needed: 15
    • Cost to build: 6,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 75 to 100 (5d6+60)
    • Weapons: Ram and one ranged weapon; added separately
  • Longship
    • Crew needed: 75
    • Builders needed: 10
    • Cost to build: 8,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 10 weeks
    • SHP: 65 to 80 (5d4+60)
    • Weapons: One ranged weapon; added separately

Rank 3 vessels

  • Large Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 70
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 11,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 14 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 180 (5d12+120)
    • Weapons: Two ranged weapons; added separately
  • Transport Sailing Ship
    • Crew needed: 12
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 15,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 14 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 180 (5d12+120)
    • Weapons: none
  • Large Galley
    • Crew needed: 250
    • Builders needed: 20
    • Cost to build: 16,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 12 weeks
    • SHP: 95 to 120 (5d6+90)
    • Weapons: Ram and two ranged weapons; added separately
  • War Galley
    • Crew needed: 400
    • Builders needed: 25
    • Cost to build: 32,500 gp
    • Base time to build: 18 weeks
    • SHP: 125 to 150 (5d6+120)
    • Weapons: Ram, included, and three ranged weapons that can be added separately.

Rank 4 vessels

  • Dreadnought (Complete stats
    • Crew needed: 500
      • 300 rowers, 150 per side
      • 200 regular crew, including command
    • Builders needed: 60
    • Cost to build: 64,000 gp
    • Base time to build: 36 weeks
    • SHP: 175 to 270 (5d20+170)
    • Weapons: Ram and six ranged weapons; all included
      • Cannons can replace a ranged weapon for 30% per cannon added.
    • Speed: 100 ft / round sailing, 60 ft / round rowing
    • Miles traveled per day: 60 mi / day sailing, 36 mi / day rowing
    • Cargo: 45,000 lbs
    • Size: 60 ft wide, 220 ft long, draft of 8-12 ft

Demonologist Spell List

Demonologist Spell List

The Demonologist class is located here.

Level 1 LEvel 4 Level 7
1 Augury 1  Bestow / Remove Curse 1  Limited Wish
2 Burning Hands 2  Enchant Arms 2  Power Word: Stun
3 Detect Magic 3  Fear 3  Simulacrum
4 Identify 4  Fire Shield 4  Summon Demon
5 Light / Darkness 5  Polymorph Self 5  Summon Monster 6
6 Protection from Evil / Good 6  Polymorph Other
7 Read Languages 7  Summon Monster 3
8 Read Magic 8  Wall of Fire
9 Summon Familiar
10 Summon Minor Monster
Level 2 LEvel 5 Level 8
1 Bane * 1  Animate Dead 1  Mind Blank
2 Darkness Globe 2  Cloudkill 2  Power Word: Blind
3 Detect Evil / Good 3  Contact Other Plane 3  Summon Monster 7
4 Detect Invisible 4  Magic Jar 4  Symbol
5 Ray of Enfeeblement 5  Summon Monster 4 5  Trap the Soul
6 Scare 6  Summon Shadow
7 Strength 7  Teleport
8 Summon Monster 1 8  True Seeing
Level 3 LEvel 6 Level 9
1  Dispel Magic 1  Cone of Flame ** 1  Astral Projection
2  Flame Arrow 2  Death Spell 2  Gate
3  Fireball 3  Dweomer of Rage 3  Meteor Swarm
4  Infravision 4  Legend Lore 4  Power Word: Kill
5  Protection from Evil / Good 10′ radius 5  Spirit Wrath 5  Summon Monster 8
6  Slow * 6  Summon Monster 5 6  Wish
7  Tongues
8  Summon Monster 2

* This spell cannot be cast as the reverse
except to counter another spell of the same
name.
** Like cone of cold, except it deals fire
damage.

New Spells

Summon Monster, Minor
Level: 1 (Demonologist)
Duration: 1 round + 1 round per level
Range: 20’
This spell conjures 1d6 creatures with less than 1 HD or 1d2 1st-level (or 1 HD) creatures that arrive at the beginning of next round to an exact location within range which is specified by the caster. The monsters summoned are determined by the referee. Summoned monsters may be commanded to fight nearby foes and do so until death or until the spell duration ends. Creatures may be commanded to perform other tasks and do so if it is within their abilities.

Summon Monster 8
Level: 9 (Demonologist)
Duration: 9 rounds + 1 round per level
Range: 100’
This spell conjures (1d3) 8 HD creatures that arrive at the beginning of next round to an exact location within range which is specified by the caster. The monsters summoned are determined by the referee. Summoned monsters may be commanded to fight nearby foes and do so until death or until the spell duration ends. Creatures may be commanded to perform other tasks and do so if it is within their abilities.

Demonologist Class

Demonolgist by Luigi Castellani

This class was recently featured in Issue #3 of Brave the Labyrinth, a fan-written magazine by Small Niche Games. I’m glad to have been a part of it. Go buy a copy! Available in pdf.

Demonologist

Requirements: INT 12, WIS 9, CHA 15
Prime Requisite: INT and CHA
Hit Dice: 1d4
Maximum Level: 20

The Demonologist is a specialized variation of the magic-user class that offers up the stillwarm hearts of his victims to receive favor from his dark master, including taking on the Infernal or Demonic aspects of his master. In some places they are called Summoners of Orcus. In others, Ritualists of Bael. They are the foremost experts on the Lower Planes, masters of summoning beings from across the world and beyond to do their murderous bidding.

Demonologists share the same restrictions on armor and weapons as a magic-user and use the same tables for attack rolls. They must be of evil alignment and must worship a Demon Lord or other evil god. The prime requisite score requirements for both INT and CHA must be met in order to get an experience bonus.

Demonologists learn and prepare spells as a magic-user. They may also learn a new spell (up to the spell level they can cast) upon gaining a new level. Spells may also be learned from scrolls and other spellbooks that contain spells from the Demonologist spell-list (see below).

A Demonologist can cast spells from magic-user scrolls so long as they are on his spell list. He can also use other items such as wands, rods, and staves, as long as the spells they replicate are on his spell list.

Demonologists are often found working as spiritual advisers behind the throne and are valued for their ability to consult with supernatural beings. Due to the dangerous beings they summon, they might also be found in isolated towers far from civilization. When adventuring, they often have a specific goal in mind such as acquiring a demonic weapon, finding a tome of lost and forbidden magic, a quest for their patron, or simply the pursuit of personal power. Continue reading

Street-hood Profession

A higher-ranking (former) Street-hood

For newcomers, I’ll refer you to Secondary Professions and Skill Checks and Training and Improving Secondary Skills.

The Street-hood profession is useful for campaigns that don’t include a Bard or are set in mostly urban environments. A Street-hood is connected; he’s got acquaintances (if not friends) everywhere and, given enough time, can help the party get into just about anywhere. He’s an information broker, a minor escape artist, and able to survive the roughest prisons.

Major Stat: INT or CHA        Minor Stat: WIS

Requirements: Strictly speaking, Street-hood should be acquired at Level 1 as part of the character’s backstory or, later, as a result of the character losing all worldly possessions. How else can he learn how to survive on the streets with nothing, if he has easy access to his wealth and weapons? That being said, an alternative would be to operate under an assumed name and “give up” those possessions: give them away, sell them, entrust them to someone else, put it into a bank vault, and so on. This is less “authentic”, since it’s possible to go back to their old life, but it’s not quite as easy.

Level 1 characters with Street-hood: Since characters using this system start with Rank 3 of their profession, it’s assumed that he’s already made a few connections within his home city, town, or the starting location, though the player may decide he wants to make his own connections.

Normally, a Street-hood can have a number of Contacts (see below) equal to twice the number of the Retainers he could have, depending on his CHA score. So a Level 1 character would start knowing 1/4 of that number (rounded down); generally, between 1 and 3 Contacts.

As a guide and in order of preference: the first Contact is a Hoodlum and a close childhood friend. The Hoodlum works under the second Contact, a Thug who can acquire some contraband for the character. The Thug works for the third Contact, a Dealer, who is a fence of all types of goods.

Aside: Normally, one must start a chain of Contacts from Street-rat on up, but the Level 1 character was once the Street-rat before he or she took up adventuring. See below for the list of titles.

Paying for training: Paying for training in this skill is still required, but isn’t done in the traditional way and requires a bit of imagination. In the case of leaving one’s wealth behind, examples might be: accrued rent for a bank vault or other security for one’s wealth, shifting and repayment of debts made through gambling, botched jobs, and criminal fines, and initiation fees. If the character is entirely destitute when he begins, he can pay his dues through the normal way money is earned with professions (see below)

After acquiring Rank 1 the going becomes somewhat easier; the character has made connections and paying your “trainers” in a more direct fashion becomes much easier.

Rank 1: Hoodlum

Requires 100gp for the initial training, which includes the 10gp to gain a Street-rat Contact (see below). This covers the ‘initiation’ cost of getting other Street-rats and Hoodlums to trust your character.

  • Make a skill check to gain information by asking around or picking your own memory. You can learn general information about a person, place or thing so long as the target is something a commoner in the area would know about.
  • Make a skill check to create a shiv from materials surrounding your character. A shiv does 1d3+Str damage, but if done as a Backstab, it does x3 damage. It will also break or be useless after 5 rounds or when a violent encounter ends, whichever is sooner. It takes 1 Turn to craft a shiv.
  • You may substitute a CHA check for your Street-hood skill check to influence those on the same social level as you; typically, those who only have Rank 1 Street-hood.
  • Make a skill check to “craft” a contact. This works the same as ordinary crafting and saves you the trouble of roleplaying every aspect of it, though that would save you time and money. However, you’re creating an NPC for a specific purpose. This NPC will generally be loyal to you, but won’t act outside of their role or act against their best interests. Examples might be: a fence for selling stolen goods, a source to purchase some unavailable type of item, a source of reliable information on a particular group of people, a person to help you enter a secure building, and so on. The DM has the final say on the scope of your contact.
  • Contacts can get information on or help you connect with those one step above them and have very reliable information about the people lower-ranking than themselves. Higher-ranking contacts must be built from previous contacts.
  • At Rank 1, you can create a Street-rat or a Hoodlum contact. At this Rank, it takes 1 day / 50gp of the creation cost (rounded up), minimum 1 full day. These days do not need to be consecutive. At least one week must elapse between the creation of a contact. This cost covers the expenses incurred getting on this character’s good side, if not their trust.
  • A Street-hood may have twice as many Contacts as he could retainers, depending on his CHA score. A Contact’s morale (and therefore their probability to do something very risky for the Street-hood) is also dependent on his CHA score.
  • A contact’s buy/sell maximum is the total amount they’re willing to buy or sell you in a single transaction. This amount typically resets at the beginning of each week.

Rank 2: Thug

  • Make a skill check to gain information by asking around or picking your own memory. You can learn general information about a person, place or thing so long as the target is something a well-to-do merchant in the area would know about.
  • Make a skill check to craft a shank from materials surrounding your character. A shank does 1d6+Str damage, but if done as a Backstab, it does x3 damage. It will also break or be useless after 8 rounds or after two violent encounters end, whichever is sooner. It takes 2 Turns to craft a shiv.
  • You may substitute a CHA check for your Street-hood skill check to influence those on the same social level as you, typically those with Rank 1 or Rank 2 Street-hood.
  • Make a skill check to “craft” a contact at the level of Thug or Dealer. At Rank 2, it takes 1 day / 100gp of the creation cost. These days do not need to be consecutive.

Rank 3: Dealer

  • Make a skill check to gain information by asking around or picking your own memory. You can learn general information about a person, place or thing so long as the target is something a well-connected aristocrat in the area would know about.
  • Make a skill check to escape from ropes, bindings, manacles, Hold spells, and so on. This reflects your knowledge and experience of being bound, your will to survive, and general wiliness. One attempt can be made, at most, once every Turn, but after three failed attempts, escape is impossible unless a new Hold spell, manacle, binding, etc is attached.
  • You may substitute a CHA check for your Street-hood skill check to influence those on the same social level as you, typically those with Rank 1 to Rank 3 Street-hood.
  • Make a skill check to “craft” a contact at the level of Boss or Fixer. At Rank 3, it takes 1 day / 500gp of the creation cost. These days do not need to be consecutive.

 Rank 4: Fixer

  • Make a skill check to gain information by asking around or picking your own memory. You can learn general information about a person, place or thing so long as the target is something a local king’s close adviser would know about.
  • Make a skill check to get around a city unobserved and in 75% of the time normally required. The Street-hood must have at least one Contact in the city in order for this to function. This reflects the Street-hood’s knowledge of the back-alleys, shortcuts, ability to blend in, and use of tight-lipped contacts to help him move quickly. The Street-hood may bring with him up to 1 person / 2 total levels he has. Bulky cargo counts as two people. This ability may not be used more than once per week.
  • You may substitute a CHA check for your Street-hood skill check to influence those on the same social level as you, typically those with Rank 1 to Rank 4 Street-hood.
  • Make a skill check to “craft” a contact at the level of Broker. At Rank 4, it takes 1 day / 500gp of the creation cost. These days do not need to be consecutive.

Doing Street-hood jobs: Normally, when one earns money with a profession, one makes a Skill Check every week to find a job. This still applies, but one can choose which of their Contacts to ask for a job. The higher up in the chain the Contact is, the character can earn more money.

Earning money is done normally using a 1d20 and adding the Contact’s multiplyer (see below). However, if a 1 is rolled, no money is earned and the Contact makes a Morale check, due to the job having been botched. If the Morale check fails, the Contact loses all faith and cuts contact with the character. The Morale of all Contacts above the lost Contact is worsened by 1 as a result. This also breaks the chain of Contacts, so the character cannot do a job for any higher-ranking Contacts until the chain is restored with a new Contact.

If the Morale check is two sixes (box-cars, so to speak), the Contact was so enraged that he turned the character into the authorities or allowed the character to be implicated. Roll another d20 and add the Contact’s multiplier again; this is the fine (in gold pieces) the character must pay or be jailed for an equal number of days, rounded up to the nearest week or month (depending on the severity).

Optional Rule: Once the player starts doing things on other planes, they may need to make more exotic Contacts in the cities they travel to. Extra-planar Contacts typically cost more; perhaps 2x to 10x as much depending on the location and due to their special needs and appetites. These exotic Contacts could count separately from those on the Material Plane, but one may have only half as many Contacts per Plane.

I’d advise that Demi-gods, Gods, Arch-Devils, Demon Lords, and other very powerful beings be exempt from being a Contact, since they typically lack much interest in mortal, worldly affairs. Such beings are better dealt with by the appropriate Clerics and Magic-User spells.

Title Creation Cost Buy/Sell Max Job Mutliplyer
Street-rat 10 gp 20 gp 1x
Hoodlum 50 gp 100 gp 2x
Thug 100 gp 200 gp 4x
Dealer 500 gp 1,500 gp 10x
Boss 2,500 gp 7,500 gp 20x
Fixer 5,000 gp 20,000 gp 30x
Broker 15,000 gp 60,000 gp 50x

Percentage-Based Healing for Labyrinth Lord

Okay, I know what you’re thinking: why bother with percentage based healing? It’s too many rolls and needs a calculator. I won’t pretend to say that I’ve solved that particular problem or that this system will making your game faster.

I wrote this because Labyrinth Lord is rather short on healing in the early game and, at one of my player’s suggestion, I wanted to see if I could make healing more effective. See, after a large fight, even with two healers, the party had to camp out for days to heal everyone back up and prepare their entire first level of spells as Cure Lights Wounds.

I included the idea of bandages (1gp each, apply one shortly after taking damage to heal 1 hp and prevent bleeding damage, takes 1 Turn to apply) and healing tonics at half the price of a healing potion (heals 1d6 hp, only one quaffed per day), but it still wasn’t enough sometimes.

In the end, we’ve been testing this percentage healing out and it’s been going well so far and I believe that the time spent using a calculator a few times has been much less than the time spent organizing camp and hoping to avoid a random encounter for two in-game nights in a row.

So percentage healing looks like this:

Cure Light Wounds: 10+1d12% – On average, six heals will fully heal a character

Cure Moderate Wounds: 15+2d12% – On average, four heals will fully heal a character

Cure Critical Wounds: 20+2d12% – On average, three heals will fully heal a character

I can go into more detail if people like, but I arrived at these values by working out the average hitpoints of various classes at various levels, but particularly at levels where these spells become available. I assumed that Fighters would have a CON bonus and that a Magic-user is lower than average.

I then worked out how many of a spell one might require to heal a character fully (or nearly so). I worked out the averages of these and eventually came to these numbers, which I think are much more memorable than something that might be slightly more accurate.

Limitations:

The reasons for D&D not to use percentage based healing are quite justified, considering the hitpoint system. This won’t work well for level 1 characters and it might be inappropriate for level 18-20 characters.

A character with less than 20 hp (at a bare minimum) will find that he’s far better off with receiving 1d6+1 hp. Don’t bother implementing this system until the party is at least Level 5 or 6, perhaps even 7 if some character don’t have CON bonuses. This will work much better if you’re using the Advanced HD optional rule (basically, most classes use one die higher for hit points).

Naturally, those characters with a lower maximum hit point total will receive far less healing than those with more.

One reasoning for this is that, a Fighter’s ability to absorb damage is more of a reflection of his training at avoiding the worst of an attack and sustaining a much less severe one instead. This is where percentages comes in. If the loss of one quarter (25%) of a character’s hit points could be represented by a deep arm-wound on a Thief, a Fighter might have taken three hits that could have been much worse, but these shallower wounds are only now taxing his body in the same way as the Thief’s injury. So if the Thief is healed by 25%, his single deep arm wound and the Fighter’s three shallower wounds close up.

Low-level heals will remain useful much longer than before. If your character has got 50 hp at Level 10, getting at least 5 hp back with a Cure Light Wounds is quite handy. The inverse is also true: high-level heals are largely useless on low-level characters, but generally work as intended on characters of an appropriate level.

Let me know what you think. If anything’s unclear or if you have anything to add I’ll be happy to expand on it in the comments (or add it to the article).

Class-based Weapon Damage

I borrowed and modified this house rule from Dyson Logos over at Dyson’s Dodecahedron, but I think I’ve made enough additions to it that I can call this my own variation. It’s also worked out pretty well in my game so far, too.

As with Dyson, I was very disappointed in the variable weapon tables used in Labyrinth Lord’s AEC book; longswords and greatswords were by far the best weapons for a Fighter. In fact, when you roll a magic weapon what kind is it most of the time? A sword. Of course, my random weapon table doesn’t apply here. What does apply is that weapons should be largely cosmetic and damage output should reflect the character’s martial training. What difference does it make if he uses a sword, a waraxe, or a pair of daggers?

For definitions:

  • A one-handed weapon ranges from a punching-dagger to a dwarven waraxe. Really any weapon intended to be held in one hand.
  • A two-handed weapon range from a greataxe to morningstars to polearms.
  • An improvised weapon is any object or tool that’s being used to cause damage instead of something created to be a weapon. This includes shields (as in a shield-bash), a table leg, a glass bottle, or steak knife.
  • A ranged weapon is any thrown projectile, a bow & arrow, a crossbow & bolt, and so on.
  • Two-weapon fighting means wielding a one-handed weapon in each hand. Personally, I don’t care if the off-hand weapon is a “light” weapon (such as a dagger, hand axe, shortsword, etc) or not; the result is the same. One’s proficiency with two-weapon fighting is determines by one’s DEX modifier. Penalties start at -2 on the main-hand and -4 on the off-hand, but each + one has in Dexterity reduces the penalty to hit; DEX may never improve the result to better than +0, but magic bonuses to hit may.
  • Races listed below are the racial class as defined in the base Labyrinth Lord book.

Fighters, Paladins, Rangers, and Dwarves

  • One-handed weapons: 1d8
  • Two-handed weapons: 1d10
  • Two-weapon fighting: 1d8 / 1d4
  • Improvised weapons: 1d6

Clerics, Druids, and Elves

  • One-handed weapons: 1d6
  • Two-handed weapons: 1d8
  • Two-weapon fighting: 1d6 / 1d4
  • Improvised weapons: 1d4

Thieves, Assassins, Monks, and Halflings

  • One-handed weapons: 1d6
  • Two-handed weapons: 1d8
  • Two-weapon fighting: 1d6 / 1d6
  • Improvised weapons: 1d4

Magic-users and Illusionists

  • One-handed weapons: 1d4
  • Two-handed weapons: 1d6
  • Two-weapon fighting: 1d4 / 1d3
  • Improvised weapons: 1d3

Ranged Weapons

Ranged weapons always do their listed damage.

Unarmed Attacks

With the exception of the Monk, unarmed damage is always 1d3+STR.

I’ll finish with some notes on some of my choices:

  • It’s my opinion that a fighter-type is trained more in the use of a single weapon technique than in two and are more likely to greatly favor their dominant arm. That being said, there’s nothing stopping him from using a shield-bash as an off-hand attack. Fighters are also less likely to have a very high Dexterity score, so they’re more likely to score a hit with their main-hand on any given round. Fighter-type have good, reliable damage.
  • Alternatively, characters in classes that traditionally depend on having a high Dexterity score are ambidextrous and are very comfortable using both weapons equally. Also, even though they are likely to hit with both weapons (since their penalties are likely to be reduced), they may lack a high Strength score to improve them. Dextrous characters take a chance on burst damage.
  • In conclusion, a Fighter will strike much more often in a range from 1d8+2 (3-10), but sometimes strike for 1d8+1d4+4 (6-16). However, an Assassin is more likely to alternate evenly between 1d6 and 2d6 damage, which is much lower than the Fighter’s.
  • In a drawn-out fight, I think the Fighter will edge out the Assassin in damage dealt, but the Assassin might get two hits just when it’s needed or take out two henchmen where a Fighter might only kill with one.
  • These are examples, of course. One can always build a munchkin Assassin who puts out serious hurt, but is otherwise useless.

Weapon Carrying Capacity: The Two-and-a-Half Weapon Rule

Pathfinder Dwarf, overloaded with weapons

Like most other DM’s I’ve played with, we’ve largely ignored weight and carrying capacity except in very extreme circumstance (a party could carry out 10,000 gold pieces between them, but trying to get out the 800 pound gold statue is a bit trickier). In a similar vein, especially once players start finding and acquiring more weapons / equipment, a DM needs to either start enforcing a carrying cap rule, which is quite clunky and time consuming, or allow them to have a wide variety of weapons available for every circumstance, especially in later editions of D&D that include monsters with damage reduction that can only be overcome by a weapon of the proper alignment.

I’m presenting a third option, which, for lack of a better term, I’m calling my Two and a Half Weapon Rule.

Essentially, weapons (not to mention armor and shields) are quite heavy, but we don’t need to look at their weights too closely to know how much an adventurer would be comfortable with carrying (in order to leave room to acquire treasure and other equipment).

To that end, character have two and a half weapon slots that can be equipped or available to use at any time. Any other weapons should be left back at base or, if new weapons are picked up while adventuring, secured safely (and so it doesn’t rattle) in one’s inventory.

  • Normal single-handed weapons (including bastard swords) count as 1 slot.
  • Very small weapons like a dagger count as a half slot.
  • Two-handed weapons (excluding bastard swords) count as 2 slots.
  • A bundle of 5x javelins count as 1 slot.
  • A weapon-like wand (one that casts a spell that does hit point damage) counts as 1 slot.
  • A rod counts as 1 slot unless its description explicitly states it’s also two-handed weapon by default.
  • A magical staff counts as 2 slots.

The half slot is meant to be taken up by a ranged weapon of some sort, including ammunition. In general, adding another ranged weapon requires its own slot.

  • A shortbow, a longbow, or a light crossbow take up that half slot, but a full slot otherwise.
  • A bandolier across the chest takes up a half slot, no matter what; using two bandoliers would require a full slot. Bandoliers have a capacity of 10 lbs of items (Ex. 10x throwing knives, 10x flaming oil flasks, 5x javelins, 20x darts, and so on).
  • Up to two slings take up that half slot.
  • A heavy crossbow requires a full slot.

I included some thrown weapons in there, but they are something of a wild-card if they have magical abilities. In general, the player should designate a bundle of javelins (all of which must be of the same type) or a spear as being intended for melee or for throwing and stick to it. If it’s used as both, it’s classified as a melee weapon. Of course, exceptions can be made based on the circumstances.

Similarly, a DM might make an exception for a character to have a small utility dagger or hand-axe always available and not taking up a slot. Such a last-ditch or utility weapon should be non-magical (though using special materials is fine) and not to be used except in dire or special circumstances.

Should the DM require a character to swap out or correct what weapons he has available, the process takes 1 Turn (or at least, rounded up to 1 Turn). This is because one’s inventory, especially weapons need to be safely secured and prevented from rattling or breaking one’s more fragile equipment, so care must be taken to pack everything back up correctly.

Some examples of this rule in practice include:

  • A +1 bastard sword (1 slot), a bandolier of flaming oil flasks (half slot), a composite longbow (ranged slot), and utility hand axe (no slots)
  • Two +1 daggers (1 slot), two bandoliers of throwing knives (1 slot), a +1 longbow (ranged slot), and a utility dagger.
  • A +2 longsword (1 slot), a heavy crossbow (1 slot), and a bandolier of javelins.
  • A +2 warhammer (2 slots), a shortbow (ranged slot), and a utility hammer.
  • A staff of fireballs (2 slots), a +2 sling and a +1 sling (+3 vs giants) (ranged slot), and a ceremonial silver dagger.
  • A wand of magic missiles (1 slot), a rod of wonder (1 slot), and a +1 sling.
  • A +1 trident (2 slot), two nets (ranged slot), and a boot-knife (free)